National Trails Day

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June 1, 2013: Fishing Hole Lake
National Trails Day was celebrated on June 1st this year. Quoting a web source regarding the history of the event, “Since 1993, the first Saturday of every June is known as National Trails Day, inspiring the public and trail enthusiasts nationwide to seek out, discover, learn about, and celebrate America’s trail system…” The source continues, “…National Trails Day evolved from the 1987 report of President Ronald Reagan’s President’s Commission on Americans Outdoors. The report recommended that Americans should be able to walk out their front doors and within 15 minutes, be on trails that take them through their cities or towns and bring them back without retracing any steps. The recommendation, also known as Trails for All Americans, inevitably motivated several public and private parties to join the American Hiking Society in launching National Trails Day in 1993.

REI, in association with GroundWork Dallas, NatlTrlDay-June 01, 2013-DSC_1432 v2jh copysponsored a local event celebrating National Trails Day focused on a small section of urban wilderness known as Fishing Hole Lake. Fishing Hole Lake is under development as a part of the Elm Fork Green Belt Park Project. The spring weather has been relatively cool this year and the sky was overcast for the 49 volunteers who arrived to participate. The cloudy skies made for good working conditions and, according to Peter Payton of GroundWork Dallas, 5 miles of trail were cleared and improved and 2,400 pounds of trash was collected and hauled away to the dump.

NatlTrlDay-June 01, 2013-DSC_1458 v2jh copyThe Elm Fork is one of the four branches of the Trinity River (the other branches are the West Fork, the Clear Fork and the East Fork). Many of the lakes in North Texas are fed by the Trinity River, its branches and the various creeks that empty into it and are major sources of water for the Dallas/Fort Worth metro area. The Trinity runs right next to downtown Dallas and the city has proposed major urban renewal projects that involve the creation of parks and other public gathering spaces along the banks of a revitalized Trinity River.

Special thanks to REI Outreach Specialist Renee Shippey and GroundWork Dallas Executive Director Peter Payton for organizing the event. A very successful and rewarding experience!

Reference
1. National Trails Day: http://usparks.about.com/od/trailspathsdayhikes/a/national_trails_day.htm
2. American Hiking Society: http://www.americanhiking.org/
3. National Trails Day Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NationalTrailsDay
4. Trinity River Wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trinity_River_(Texas)
5. Trinity River Branches Wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bachman_Branch
6. Groundwork Dallas: http://www.groundworkdallas.org/
7. REI Stewardship & Volunteer Opportunities: http://www.rei.com/stewardship.html

Photos
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Lake Lewisville

“Lake Lewisville is a trash lake.”

I’ve heard that sentiment expressed countless times since relocating to North Texas in 1991. Having lived within a few miles of the lake for the majority of my time here, it wasn’t until I moved to Corinth in the fall of 2005 that I began to spend significant time in, around and on the water.

Through the years my experience with the lake has increased and I’ve seen firsthand that the statement “Lake Lewisville is a trash lake” can all too often be taken quite literally. Whether kayaking on the water, hiking a lakeside trail, bird watching in a stand of trees or camping in the woods; trash is a nearly constant, highly visible companion. Over time I have seen many examples of the natural beauty of Lake Lewisville. However, I have also seen this same natural beauty, in all its delicate wonder, marred by an unbelievable amount of litter.

Is anything being done to address the problem? Does anyone care? Seeing so much trash spread over such a large area, I sometimes wonder if others have become numb to the issue; essentially, becoming desensitized to the litter and accepting it as a normal part of the landscape. Perhaps a sense of hopelessness exists brought about by the sheer volume of trash and a feeling that the actions of individuals will not make a significant impact.

Growing up as a Boy Scout in the Colorado Rockies, concepts like “leave no trace” and “pack it in, pack it out” seemed so simple and so basic as to be obvious and self-evident. I encourage anyone who visits the lake to pick up a little trash. Take more out than you arrived with. One of my favorite sayings is “a journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.” By taking positive action in simple and quantifiable ways, we can make the lake a better place one piece of litter at a time. Together, our small steps can make a difference.